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July 25, 2017

Trial Lawyers Turn the Cradle of Liberty into the Cradle of Lawsuits

Boston, the city where John Adams made a name for himself by putting justice before personal beliefs in the Boston Massacre trial, is flooded with plaintiffs’ lawyers this week.

The cradle of liberty is this year’s home to the American Association for Justice (AAJ) Annual Conference – the plaintiffs’ lawyers’ homecoming, where they discuss the latest and greatest in litigation trends and what drugs, products, devices, and more they’ll be targeting next. 

The AAJ promises that “this convention gets betters every year,” and the schedule for Boston does not disappoint—if you’re looking for a class action lawsuit that is. 

The conference schedule includes full sessions for litigation over ski areas, guardrails, ride sharing, resort excursions, bicycles, hair dye, “inadequate security,” and so much more.

A warning to all those businesses involved in one of these industries: if you are not yet a defendant in a lawsuit, you might be soon.

Conference attendees could leave Boston with class action lawsuits ready to file – they can worry about actually finding plaintiffs later. Far too often, lawyers looking for opportunities to earn fees create class action lawsuits in search of a lead plaintiff, and not because a real person has come to them complaining about some supposed wrongdoing.

But don’t take our word for it. The class action system has become so dysfunctional that a study by the lawsuit-loving Consumer Financial Protection Bureau even found that 87% of the resolved class actions they looked at did not benefit consumers whatsoever. 

It’s the lawyers, not the plaintiffs, profiting from these lawsuits. Perhaps this is the reason the AAJ closes their conference to the public, even though the public is exactly who they are claiming to serve – a critique touted by Ralph Nader.

This leads us to believe that the “J” in AAJ does not represent the justice our founding fathers, like Boston-native John Adams, imagined. 

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